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General Pet FAQs

Answers to common questions about looking after your pets

  • How often should I worm my pet?
  • When can I get my pet microchipped?
  • Do I have to use flea treatments all year round?
  • My pet is going to have surgery - what do I need to know?

How often should I worm my pet?

How often should I worm my pet?

Puppies and kittens should be wormed every 2 weeks from 2 weeks of age until they are 12 weeks old, again when they are 16 weeks old and approximately every 3 months thereafter.

When can I get my pet microchipped?

When can I get my pet microchipped?

We recommend you wait until your pet is 4 months old before it is microchipped. This reduces the chances of the microchip migrating under the skin from the site of injection as the animal grows.

Do I have to use flea treatments all year round?

Do I have to use flea treatments all year round?

Yes. The environmental conditions modern centrally heated homes provide in winter are ideal for the lifecycle of fleas so you should be using a prescription-only flea product from your vet every month throughout the year. Remember that only 5% of the flea lifecycle is on the pet - the other 95% is in your home!

My pet is going to have surgery - what do I need to know?

My pet is going to have surgery - what do I need to know?

The Night Before

  • Please give your pet no food after 6:00pm

  • Water may be left down overnight but should be taken up after midnight

  • Cats: Please keep in overnight with access to a litter tray

Morning of Operation

  • No food or titbits to be given in the morning to reduce the possibility of choking whilst under anaesthetic

  • Take water away from your pet at least one hour before travelling to the surgery.

  • Exercise dogs in the morning to allow them an opportunity to empty their bladder and bowels.

Bringing your pet to the surgery

  • Please bring your pet to the surgery at the time arranged.

  • On arrival at the surgery, you will be asked to sign a Consent Form for the procedure and any anaesthetic or sedative to be given.

  • There is a small risk associated with the administration of any depressive drug, but in healthy animals, complications are rare. If you or the Veterinary Surgeon think your pet is in any way at greater risk due to illness or old age, we will be happy to discuss the implications.

  • Routine pre-operative blood tests are available and may be useful, particularly in pets over 7 or 8 years. Please ask for more details.

  • Please read the Consent Form carefully and advise of any other treatment required whilst the animal is under anaesthetic, e.g. dental, nail clipping, grooming, ear cleaning etc.

  • We will normally check all dogs before giving a pre-anaesthetic sedative. Cats for operations will be checked by staff after being left unless owners wish to consult the Veterinary Surgeon first.

  • You will also be asked to provide a daytime contact number for any queries that may arise.

Collection of pet from surgery

  • This will normally be between 3:30pm and 5:00pm.

  • The Vet/Nurse will ring you between 12noon and 2:00pm with a progress report.

  • The complete fee is payable at the time of discharge.

  • We recommend "Recovery Diet" post-operation.

  • Please remain in the waiting room. Entry to operating and kennelling areas is by invitation only.

In some cases, we may request a post-op examination (which is free of charge) after 2-3 days.